comicshans:

I googled ‘knockoff mcdonalds’ and was not disappointed

(Source: andren)

kemendraugh:

This is my little brother, reading my Hawkeye issue #19. He is hearing impaired and is currently using/learning sign language as his primary means of communication. He spent his entire lunchtime pouring over this comic, so excited about his language being in one of my books! And a superhero book!

mattfractionblog, thank you for this. 

(We have the entire Signing Time series too, and our lives would be poorer without it! Such a blessing.)

annicron:

look at this thing i got at the airport when leaving germany
it’s a giant tic tac box filled with tiny tic tac boxes

annicron:

look at this thing i got at the airport when leaving germany

it’s a giant tic tac box filled with tiny tic tac boxes

gg-art:

Back panel is done. Sleeves are probably done. Unsure if I want to paint on the front of the jacket or not.  I’ll take a picture of how it looks on tomorrow. Though I have no idea how I’ll take a picture of my own back….

The significance of plot without conflict

stilleatingoranges:

In the West, plot is commonly thought to revolve around conflict: a confrontation between two or more elements, in which one ultimately dominates the other. The standard three- and five-act plot structures—which permeate Western media—have conflict written into their very foundations. A “problem” appears near the end of the first act; and, in the second act, the conflict generated by this problem takes center stage. Conflict is used to create reader involvement even by many post-modern writers, whose work otherwise defies traditional structure.

The necessity of conflict is preached as a kind of dogma by contemporary writers’ workshops and Internet “guides” to writing. A plot without conflict is considered dull; some even go so far as to call it impossible. This has influenced not only fiction, but writing in general—arguably even philosophy. Yet, is there any truth to this belief? Does plot necessarily hinge on conflict? No. Such claims are a product of the West’s insularity. For countless centuries, Chinese and Japanese writers have used a plot structure that does not have conflict “built in”, so to speak. Rather, it relies on exposition and contrast to generate interest. This structure is known as kishōtenketsu.

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highqualityfashion:

Chanel Couture SS 10

highqualityfashion:

Chanel Couture SS 10

(via kowai-neko)

yahoosports:

PLAYOFFS.

yahoosports:

PLAYOFFS.

stormtrooperfashion:

Raquel Zimmermann in “The Plastics” by David Sims for Love Magazine, Fall 2014/Winter 2015

stormtrooperfashion:

Raquel Zimmermann in “The Plastics” by David Sims for Love Magazine, Fall 2014/Winter 2015

(via charlesmontgomerypunk)